It’s National Franks and Beans Day! Celebrate With the Ultimate Summertime Food and A Great Picture Book!

07.13.19
Age: 3-5
Hotdiggitydog

07.13.19 • 3:06 pm EST | 0 responses |

Hot Diggity Dog: The History of the Hot Dog

By Adrienne Sylver; illustrated by Elwood H. Smith

Summer is spending itself with the speed at which kids consume hot dogs at a summer barbecue. So, I couldn’t help reposting this blog from 2017 when Tomie De Paola’s art-mail greeted me this morning and reminded me what day it was and what we celebrate nationally today.

And what better picture book to meet and greet it with than Adrienne Styler’s homage to the hot dog.

This historical hymn to the hot dog will put parents and young readers in touch with their inner child, and bring back fond memories of favorite hot dog hang outs and haunts you parents still remember! It certainly did for me.

Mine was Callahan’s in Fort Lee, New Jersey. Since 1950, this roadside stand that sat next to a rival hot dog stand called Hiram’s, (yes, these TWO distinct places existed side by side, each with their own faithful followers for many years), quenched the taste buds of hot dog hounds from near and far! The motto of Callahan’s was, “So Big, So Good” and it was. More to follow, faithful frank followers!!

My husband was and is a “Hiram’s Hound” and loved the rival’s hot dogs. A challenge was thrown down! We even had a blind taste taste at home where he purchased one hot dog from Callahan’s and one from Hiram’s and dared me, blindfolded, to discern which was which.

Are you kidding? I had been consuming Callahan’s hot dogs from the age of FIVE! And so the taste test was no biggie. This Brooklyn boy was stunned. But he remained loyal to Hiram’s! Hey, that’s why there’s vanilla and chocolate ice cream, no?

4855539_orig Ms. Sylver’s picture book lets us in on the facts of how Americans fell in love with a “dog on a bun” aka a frank, wiener, or “red hot”, as they’re referred to regionally and we continue to consume them at a rate of 2 billion each July! A tasty tip Ms. Sylver mentions is THAT is enough hot dog links to encircle the earth seven times. Actually, the hot dog is not so All American a food as you may think. Its area of origination seems to have been Frankfort, Germany or Vienna, Austria in the 1400’s and later found its way to America in the 1860’s.

Kids will love learning facts about the birth of the bun. Did you know hot dogs were first sold bunless? Ouch! That burns the fingers! And after losing a ton of gloves that the vendor gave as hot dog “holders”, he asked his brother-in-law that happened to be a baker for a hand. The baker handed him a BUN for his franks. Necessity definitely was the “Mother of Invention” here!

The famous Coney Island hot dog sold for a mere nickel and in the Great Depression when jobs and therefore food was scarce, a nickel could buy a great meal and their popularity boomed!

Young readers will find out how the hot dog found its way to ballparks and even find that actors like the famous Humphrey Bogart were devotees of the dog when he said, “A hot dog at the ball park is better than a steak at the Ritz!

Elwood H. Smith’s lively illustrations match this hot dog handbook to a tee! And the sidebar facts and suggestions included on each page will pique your child’s interest. It’s the perfect summer read. So, now let’s get back to MY favorite hot dog haven. Callahan’s has morphed into a food truck, as that seems to be the new craze today. You follow the truck for one of the greatest hot dogs – EVER. The relish is even a special blend! Now where is that truck parked next? Hmmmm. Callahan’s forever!

Here is a link to let you in on a taste of the history of Callahan’s!  http://www.callahanshotdogs.com/

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